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Barstool Continues Foray into Event Space with Barstool Classic

The Barstool Classic will hit eight cities in its first year, providing the company’s fans and golfers with the chance to compete for $10,000.

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Photo Credit: Rob Schumacher-USA TODAY Sports

Golf is one of the few sports fans are as passionate about playing as they are watching. With that knowledge in mind, Barstool Sports is launching the Barstool Classic, an amateur golf tour with $10,000 on the line. The multi-month event will have eight qualifying tournaments culminating in a championship tournament.

The tour is the brainchild of Barstool blogger and Fore Play golf podcast host Sam Riggs Bozoian.

“Anyone who is a big fan, they typically play golf, and they ultimately want to play for something,” Bozoian said. “When I’m at the practice green watching 10-foot putts, I can’t envision I’m winning the Master’s, but luckily we have the resources to do this so we can play for something that matters comparable to what I’m watching.”

READ MORE: How The 2019 Masters Revived ‘The Tiger Effect’

Bozoian went to Barstool CEO Erika Nardini to pitch the event series shortly after coming up with the idea two months ago. The tour was pulled together quickly and announced with six of the nine courses booked. The speed to market is in line with many of the other ideas Barstool has started to execute, Nardini said.

“We do everything quickly,” Nardini said. “Golf is appealing because we love golf, and we have young fans who love golf the way we do. We try to have fun with everything we do and to approach stuff in a way that’s easy-going and approachable. The Barstool Classic is a great example of that.”

The Barstool Classic is the most recent example of the company stepping outside the box with auxiliary events to supplement the core media offerings. In the recent past, Barstool has held live shows plus started a punk rock band and amateur boxing circuit. Nardini said the brand will also release a comedy special in May. There’s no telling what might come next from Barstool.

I’m not sure exactly what you’ll see from us in the future, but I guarantee it will be funny, sometimes unexpected and decidedly authentic,” she said.

Nardini also didn’t explicitly say the events are meant to generate new revenue but noted she hopes brand partners see value, while “everyone who plays in the Barstool Classic has an absolute blast and we capture some funny moments.”

Web Smith, the founder of 2PM Inc., believes the event’s greatest purpose may not be the revenue it draws but what it can do for Barstool Gold, the company’s premium subscription service. Barstool Classic registration opened to Barstool Gold members on Wednesday, 24 hours ahead of Thursday’s opening to the general public.

“This is just the latest piece of the puzzle,” Smith said. “I wouldn’t categorize it purely in the event space of attracting people to a physical location, but it feels it’s adding value to the gold membership. It gives some incentive to have that membership to sign up early. Not to mention this is another event where they sell lots of merchandise and offer another platform for their sponsors.”

The eight qualifying tournaments will be held in Connecticut, Chicago, Washington, D.C., Philadelphia and the greater Boston and New York areas. Bozoian said the first year will be small to ensure it’s the best-possible event before potentially expanding in a wider geographic footprint next year.

“We’re pretty much hitting the major Barstool markets that have had hubs for nearly a decade or more,” Bozoian said. “We’ve already received a lot of why not a ‘West Coast event? South? Texas?’ The answer is we’ve never put on a golf event and we’d rather do it well, make sure we fill it out and provide the most enthusiasm we can and knock it out of the park.

“We don’t want to get ahead of ourselves, but my vision is more stops, more cities and more dates.”

READ MORE: Internal Drive Keeps Alex Rodriguez Busy After Baseball Career

Each of the eight qualifying events will be open to 54 teams of two, who will play the course with a shotgun start to ensure the players can enjoy a happy hour and full dinner following the round. A few spots will be reserved for “celebrity fans,” Bozoian said, to add “some clout.” Barstool will also focus on providing fans the ability to interact with staffers.

The top six teams from each course will move on to the finale with the $10,000 on the line. Bozoian said he worked with the U.S. Golf Association to ensure those who wish to keep amateur status will be able to waive the prize.

Whether or not the Barstool Classic succeeds in the company’s desired mission is yet to be determined. But Barstool appears intent on maintaining a presence in the events space.

Pat Evans is a writer based in Las Vegas, focusing on sports business, food, and beverage. He graduated from Michigan State University in 2012. He's written two books: Grand Rapids Beer and Nevada Beer. Evans can be reached at pat@frntofficesport.com.

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CrossFit Deletes Its Facebook Account, Denounces “Utopian Socialists”

The fitness and regime company posted a bullet-pointed list of grievances with the social media network in the days following their exodus.

Robert Silverman

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In a sprawling, occasionally hyperbolic, and definitely adversarial public statement, CrossFit announced on Thursday that it has deleted its main Facebook and Instagram accounts. Citing data and privacy concerns and spurred by the brief suspension of one private Facebook diet group, the fitness and trademarked workout company has cut ties with this cabal of “utopian socialists,” as CrossFit described the individuals who run Facebook, a company estimated to be worth $512 billion.

Evidence of the social media exodus was apparently first unearthed by Armen Hammer, a fitness podcaster who posted a screenshot of the now-deleted CrossFit account on Instagram on Monday. He posted a screenshot of the now-deleted CrossFit account on Instagram on Monday, scrawling “Um…what?” over the image and adding the text: “So this is interesting. What’s up @crossfit? You guys okay over there?”

Two days later, a CrossFit affiliate in the United Kingdom confirmed that the deletion was neither the result of a temporary suspension nor a minor glitch. By Thursday, CrossFit was ready to offer a full explanation of its reasoning.

The missive posted on CrossFit’s website begins by positing the company as the final bulwark against the “ tsunami of chronic disease” other, non-CrossFit health and wellness companies, have unleashed upon an unwitting world, specifically the “unholy alliance of academia, government, and multinational food, beverage, and pharmaceutical companies.” While the site continues to publish reported articles and video features on their website, their ex-Facebook and Instagram pages, CrossFit claims, served as a vital hub for their unceasing efforts to promote truth, justice, and a grueling exercise regime. They were a place to combat “overreaching governments, malicious competitors, and corrupt academic organizations,” CrossFit wrote.

But alas, the good fight will no longer be fought—at least on social media. The inciting incident was the temporary suspension without explanation of a low-carb diet private group Facebook page, Banting 7 Day Meal Plans. Located in South Africa, the group boasts over 1.6 million members. Reached by phone, a CrossFit spokesperson said they had no formal relationship with Banting 7 Day Meal Plans, but were notified of the suspension by the “group owner.” (A Banting 7 Day Meal Plans moderator did not respond to a request for comment prior to publication.)

Further, “Several members of CrossFit’s leadership have personal connections with the low carb community, such as Professor Tim Noakes,” the spokesperson said via email. Noakes, a South African low-carb diet guru, has been featured prominently on CrossFit’s website. In 2014, Noakes suggested to a mother on Twitter that her baby could be put on a low-carb, high-fat diet. A year later, he was brought before the Health Professions Council of South Africa (HPCSA), alleging Noakes had behaved unethically. (One CrossFit blog covering the ordeal was titled: “Nutritional Fascism and the ‘Twitter Trial.’”) The HPCSA ultimately ruled in favor of Noakes, who did not immediately respond to an emailed request for comment.

Though Banting 7 Day Meal Plans account has since been reinstated, Facebook had finally gone too far, according to a spokesperson. “This highlights the incredibly precarious nature of [Facebook’s moderation policies and guidelines],” the spokesperson said. “You can build a community and get it removed and you don’t get an explanation.”

If you can work your way through the sweaty, muscular prose in their statement, the issues with Facebook raised by CrossFit are valid. (Facebook declined to comment.) In addition to the aforementioned question of how the site is moderated and guidelines are enforced, CrossFit outlined eight points of contention with Facebook’s ongoing practices. They included, but were not limited to: aggregating and then selling user data without permission, both to corporate and governmental entities; participating in civilian surveillance programs; the lack of security and inability to protect intellectual property; the spreading of misinformation; and the massive and frequent breaches of Facebook’s security protocols, all of which have been extensively reported in the last few years.

But CrossFit also wrote: “Facebook’s news feeds are censored and crafted to reflect the political leanings of Facebook’s utopian socialists while remaining vulnerable to misinformation campaigns designed to stir up violence and prejudice.”

Do they really believe, regardless of whatever societal ills have been unleashed by the social network—including the possible aiding and abetting of genocide—that Facebook’s leaders would in any way consider themselves socialists, utopian or otherwise?

The spokesperson admitted with a chuckle that that wasn’t intended to be read as a literal description of Mark Zuckerberg’s or any other Facebook executive’s political leanings. Instead, the phrase was meant to convey their overall “worldview.” The larger message, the spokesperson said, was that Facebook and other social media sites represent an ongoing “social experiment” which has exacerbated and amplified bad actors on both sides of the political spectrum. Nor was this an attempt to tie CrossFit to any particular political ideology, other than opposing censorship.

Using extreme language is not new for CrossFit. Founder Greg Glassman previously described his globe-spanning fitness empire as “a religion run by a biker gang.” When Congress proposed legislation requiring trainers to obtain certification or face possible criminal charges, Glassman swore he’d meet force with force. “I’m going to get my own asshole lobbyists,” Glassman bragged to Maxim Magazine in 2015. “I’m going to fuck some people up.”

Similarly, CrossFit’s social media team has on occasion taken an equally adversarial pose. As Inc. reported in 2013, whenever they encounter an online entity CrossFit deems an enemy, from random bloggers to parody accounts, they declare total war. Or as Inc. wrote: “the goal is simple: obliterate them.”  

The spokesperson added: “As you can see in our statement, we’re kind of a contrarian group.”

CrossFit may have abandoned posting for now—and they still maintain a presence on both Twitter and YouTube, both of which have their own issues with censorship and suborning extremism—but it is willing to reconsider should Facebook alter how it functions.

Of course, with CrossFit partially exiting the digital stage, a few copycat accounts have cropped up, looking to dupe unwitting individuals and snag a follower or two. (On Thursday, Facebook announced that it had deleted more than 3 billion fraudulent accounts during a six-month period, from October 2018 to March 2019.)  Still, CrossFit insisted they weren’t attempting to compel Facebook to enact any reforms.

“From our perspective, we have broad specific concerns about how Facebook manages data and serves as an authority over groups that develop on its property,” the spokesperson said. Given the lack of faith in Facebook’s ability to take a stand against powerful, entrenched interests, both public and private, “We don’t want to support Facebook with our audience and our platform.”

READ MORE: Inside the World of Pirated Streams, And What It Takes to Stop Them

And for the individuals running the 15,000 CrossFit outposts spanning 162 countries, this shouldn’t be considered a top-down mandate. Each affiliate is free to choose how and where they chose to market themselves, both online and off.

One affiliate, though, seems inclined to back the parent company. Hari Singh, the owner of CrossFit NYC, which opened in 2006 and ranks as the eighth oldest CrossFit affiliate in existence, said their page would remain active, at least for the moment.

“We’ll decide if Facebook has any value to us moving forward,” Singh said by phone. “I’m not sure that it does.”  

*Editor’s Note: An original version of this story had Armen Hammer listed as the actor and star of the movie “The Social Network.” The correct Armen Hammer is a fitness podcaster. We have made the correction and apologize for the confusion.

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Turning ESPN Around

Jimmy Pitaro has been able to increase digital offerings and improve the brand’s image in the wake of the network being criticized for being too political.

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Photo Credit: Kirby Lee-USA TODAY Sports

*This piece first appeared in the Front Office Sports Newsletter. Subscribe today and get the news before anyone else.

In just over a year since joining ESPN as the company’s president, it looks as if Jimmy Pitaro has been able to turn things around.

After a period of turbulence that included layoffs, a strained relationship with the NFL, and a falling linear subscriber base, things at the WWL seem to be looking up.

What has worked?

  • ESPN+: The OTT streaming service now has a reported 2 million subscribers after a year of being live.
  • New Digital Offerings: ESPN has expanded its presence on platforms like Snapchat, YouTube and Twitter.
  • Leveraging ABC: To further its reach, ESPN has found success putting marquee events and games (NBA games, NFL Draft, college football games) on the free to air TV channel.

More sports, fewer politics…

While some championed ESPN’s coverage of events where politics and sports seemingly intertwined, Pitaro believes he has brought clarity to the company when it comes to what fans of ESPN truly want.

“Without question, our data tells us our fans do not want us to cover politics. My job is to provide clarity. I really believe that some of our talent was confused on what was expected of them. If you fast-forward to today, I don’t believe they are confused.” – Jimmy Pitaro to Stephen Battaglio of the LA Times.

What they are saying…

“We’ve done some brand research that suggests ESPN’s brand is stronger than it was a few years ago.” – Bob Iger to Disney investors

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Rachel Nichols and ‘The Jump’ Lead the Way in Daily NBA Coverage

With the NBA playoffs reaching their peak, Rachel Nichols and “The Jump” are ramping up coverage, bringing the latest news to the growing NBA community.

Bailey Knecht

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Photo Credit: Bill Streicher-USA TODAY Sports

One afternoon, in the middle of his appearance as a panelist on ESPN’s “The Jump,” Scottie Pippen received a text from Michael Jordan letting Pippen know MJ was watching the show. Another time, Bill Russell tweeted at host Rachel Nichols about that day’s episode.

“It’s the ultimate compliment because growing up, we idolized these players,” says Danny Corrales, ‘The Jump’ producer. “To know current and former players are looking at our show as a credible source of NBA news and information is really flattering.”

In its three and a half years on the air, “The Jump” has made a name for itself as the go-to show for daily basketball news, even for the sport’s biggest stars.

“The show is on at practice facilities, training facilities and hotels, so we’ll get texts and hear from players, GMs and front office people, talking about rumors we address on the show,” Nichols says.

It’s not just Hall of Famers and NBA team personnel that tune in. “The Jump” averages around 300,000 viewers per day and is regularly one of the most-watched ESPN shows on-demand.

The common thread between those who watch? A deep love for the NBA and all of its drama, on and off the court.

“That’s what we’re striving for, that everyone from NBA fans to players to team owners can come hang out with us,” Nichols says. “It’s a centralized hub or hangout.”

READ MORE: ESPN Brings AR to Life for NBA Playoffs

With the playoffs in full swing, the Emmy-nominated crew is now out of the studio and on the road, providing on-site coverage for the remainder of the season.

“To me, being where the game is has always been an important part of my coverage,” Nichols says. “I feel like I need to be here, going to practice and talking to guys, going to games, going into the locker room and talking about what’s going on…It brings an immediacy, a currency, and that helps viewers be there with us.”

A prime-time version of the show has also been added for the NBA Finals, airing on ESPN from 8 to 8:30 p.m. ET ahead of weekday Finals games.

“Every time we hit the road, we try to replicate our daily show as best as we can, and it’s not easy being on the road because there’s a comfort level you gain in the studio,” Corrales says. “Our goal for this year is to continue to do the show the way we do the normal show, with the same topics, same guests and same passionate energy.”

When she created “The Jump,” Nichols pushed for it to feel like a casual basketball discussion with friends. The show features media members and former players conversing around a table, and the studio is set up more like a living room than a traditional anchor desk.

“That’s what I’m doing on my weekend afternoon—sitting around, talking about basketball with friends, and that transferred into everything about the show,” Nichols says. “It’s not a big, huge set, and there are no big monitors, because I don’t have big monitors in my living room, so why would we have that here?”

Rather than showing highlights or going in-depth on Xs and Os, Nichols and her panelists dive into the quirky, peripheral side of the sport.

“We’re having an educated basketball conversation and telling you things you don’t know, so if you’re a diehard, you’re still learning, but we hope it’s accessible for other people, too,” Nichols says.

It’s not all about the fun, lighthearted side of the NBA, though. An experienced journalist, Nichols does not shy away from heavy topics in her introductory monologues and interviews, such as the Dallas Mavericks’ sexual misconduct investigation in 2018.

“In a way, I’ve been prepping my whole career,” says Nichols, who has covered major controversies involving sports figures like Roger Goodell and Floyd Mayweather. “I’ve done investigative pieces, and I’ve covered serious league issues for months at a time. I feel good that if something serious comes up, I can steer the conversation.”

READ MORE: Ernie Johnson Talks March Madness, Sports Media and More

Nichols and her crew have made an effort to balance those serious topics with the NBA’s goofier stories, though. For example, they recently discussed a Milwaukee-based radio station that refuses to play Drake songs during the Bucks’ playoff series against the Toronto Raptors.

“We’re giving good weight to both [serious and fun] topics, and we’re staying true to the character of the show and who I am, too,” Nichols said.

The NBA is rarely bereft of topics to discuss, so Nichols leans on fans and NBA Twitter to find fresh content and drive the conversation. She says social media has “helped with that communal feel, like we’re all in this together.”

With the Finals around the corner, that community will embrace the drama, with Nichols and her crew leading the discussion every step of the way.

“The NBA is a celebrity league, and the players are superstars,” Nichols says. “People feel like they know these guys, so the whole thing feels like a high school cafeteria, where we know what table everybody is sitting at. We also have a table in the cafeteria, and now we have a yearbook.”

When she first pitched “The Jump,” Nichols took a risk, hoping to find an audience for a daily afternoon basketball show. Now, just a few years later, “The Jump” has become the preferred NBA show for basketball junkies—regular fans to NBA legends alike.

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