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CrossFit Deletes Its Facebook Account, Denounces “Utopian Socialists”

The fitness and regime company posted a bullet-pointed list of grievances with the social media network in the days following their exodus.

Robert Silverman

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In a sprawling, occasionally hyperbolic, and definitely adversarial public statement, CrossFit announced on Thursday that it has deleted its main Facebook and Instagram accounts. Citing data and privacy concerns and spurred by the brief suspension of one private Facebook diet group, the fitness and trademarked workout company has cut ties with this cabal of “utopian socialists,” as CrossFit described the individuals who run Facebook, a company estimated to be worth $512 billion.

Evidence of the social media exodus was apparently first unearthed by Armen Hammer, a fitness podcaster who posted a screenshot of the now-deleted CrossFit account on Instagram on Monday. He posted a screenshot of the now-deleted CrossFit account on Instagram on Monday, scrawling “Um…what?” over the image and adding the text: “So this is interesting. What’s up @crossfit? You guys okay over there?”

Two days later, a CrossFit affiliate in the United Kingdom confirmed that the deletion was neither the result of a temporary suspension nor a minor glitch. By Thursday, CrossFit was ready to offer a full explanation of its reasoning.

The missive posted on CrossFit’s website begins by positing the company as the final bulwark against the “ tsunami of chronic disease” other, non-CrossFit health and wellness companies, have unleashed upon an unwitting world, specifically the “unholy alliance of academia, government, and multinational food, beverage, and pharmaceutical companies.” While the site continues to publish reported articles and video features on their website, their ex-Facebook and Instagram pages, CrossFit claims, served as a vital hub for their unceasing efforts to promote truth, justice, and a grueling exercise regime. They were a place to combat “overreaching governments, malicious competitors, and corrupt academic organizations,” CrossFit wrote.

But alas, the good fight will no longer be fought—at least on social media. The inciting incident was the temporary suspension without explanation of a low-carb diet private group Facebook page, Banting 7 Day Meal Plans. Located in South Africa, the group boasts over 1.6 million members. Reached by phone, a CrossFit spokesperson said they had no formal relationship with Banting 7 Day Meal Plans, but were notified of the suspension by the “group owner.” (A Banting 7 Day Meal Plans moderator did not respond to a request for comment prior to publication.)

Further, “Several members of CrossFit’s leadership have personal connections with the low carb community, such as Professor Tim Noakes,” the spokesperson said via email. Noakes, a South African low-carb diet guru, has been featured prominently on CrossFit’s website. In 2014, Noakes suggested to a mother on Twitter that her baby could be put on a low-carb, high-fat diet. A year later, he was brought before the Health Professions Council of South Africa (HPCSA), alleging Noakes had behaved unethically. (One CrossFit blog covering the ordeal was titled: “Nutritional Fascism and the ‘Twitter Trial.’”) The HPCSA ultimately ruled in favor of Noakes, who did not immediately respond to an emailed request for comment.

Though Banting 7 Day Meal Plans account has since been reinstated, Facebook had finally gone too far, according to a spokesperson. “This highlights the incredibly precarious nature of [Facebook’s moderation policies and guidelines],” the spokesperson said. “You can build a community and get it removed and you don’t get an explanation.”

If you can work your way through the sweaty, muscular prose in their statement, the issues with Facebook raised by CrossFit are valid. (Facebook declined to comment.) In addition to the aforementioned question of how the site is moderated and guidelines are enforced, CrossFit outlined eight points of contention with Facebook’s ongoing practices. They included, but were not limited to: aggregating and then selling user data without permission, both to corporate and governmental entities; participating in civilian surveillance programs; the lack of security and inability to protect intellectual property; the spreading of misinformation; and the massive and frequent breaches of Facebook’s security protocols, all of which have been extensively reported in the last few years.

But CrossFit also wrote: “Facebook’s news feeds are censored and crafted to reflect the political leanings of Facebook’s utopian socialists while remaining vulnerable to misinformation campaigns designed to stir up violence and prejudice.”

Do they really believe, regardless of whatever societal ills have been unleashed by the social network—including the possible aiding and abetting of genocide—that Facebook’s leaders would in any way consider themselves socialists, utopian or otherwise?

The spokesperson admitted with a chuckle that that wasn’t intended to be read as a literal description of Mark Zuckerberg’s or any other Facebook executive’s political leanings. Instead, the phrase was meant to convey their overall “worldview.” The larger message, the spokesperson said, was that Facebook and other social media sites represent an ongoing “social experiment” which has exacerbated and amplified bad actors on both sides of the political spectrum. Nor was this an attempt to tie CrossFit to any particular political ideology, other than opposing censorship.

Using extreme language is not new for CrossFit. Founder Greg Glassman previously described his globe-spanning fitness empire as “a religion run by a biker gang.” When Congress proposed legislation requiring trainers to obtain certification or face possible criminal charges, Glassman swore he’d meet force with force. “I’m going to get my own asshole lobbyists,” Glassman bragged to Maxim Magazine in 2015. “I’m going to fuck some people up.”

Similarly, CrossFit’s social media team has on occasion taken an equally adversarial pose. As Inc. reported in 2013, whenever they encounter an online entity CrossFit deems an enemy, from random bloggers to parody accounts, they declare total war. Or as Inc. wrote: “the goal is simple: obliterate them.”  

The spokesperson added: “As you can see in our statement, we’re kind of a contrarian group.”

CrossFit may have abandoned posting for now—and they still maintain a presence on both Twitter and YouTube, both of which have their own issues with censorship and suborning extremism—but it is willing to reconsider should Facebook alter how it functions.

Of course, with CrossFit partially exiting the digital stage, a few copycat accounts have cropped up, looking to dupe unwitting individuals and snag a follower or two. (On Thursday, Facebook announced that it had deleted more than 3 billion fraudulent accounts during a six-month period, from October 2018 to March 2019.)  Still, CrossFit insisted they weren’t attempting to compel Facebook to enact any reforms.

“From our perspective, we have broad specific concerns about how Facebook manages data and serves as an authority over groups that develop on its property,” the spokesperson said. Given the lack of faith in Facebook’s ability to take a stand against powerful, entrenched interests, both public and private, “We don’t want to support Facebook with our audience and our platform.”

READ MORE: Inside the World of Pirated Streams, And What It Takes to Stop Them

And for the individuals running the 15,000 CrossFit outposts spanning 162 countries, this shouldn’t be considered a top-down mandate. Each affiliate is free to choose how and where they chose to market themselves, both online and off.

One affiliate, though, seems inclined to back the parent company. Hari Singh, the owner of CrossFit NYC, which opened in 2006 and ranks as the eighth oldest CrossFit affiliate in existence, said their page would remain active, at least for the moment.

“We’ll decide if Facebook has any value to us moving forward,” Singh said by phone. “I’m not sure that it does.”  

*Editor’s Note: An original version of this story had Armen Hammer listed as the actor and star of the movie “The Social Network.” The correct Armen Hammer is a fitness podcaster. We have made the correction and apologize for the confusion.

Robert Silverman is a freelance journalist living in New York. His work has appeared in The Daily Beast, The New York Times, ESPN, The Guardian, Deadspin, HuffPost, The Outline and more.

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NBA, Instagram and New Era to Deliver Shoppable Championship Moment

As Instagram expands into e-commerce, it’s teaming up with the NBA and New Era to offer fans the opportunity to buy officially licensed championship gear.

Michael McCarthy

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Photo Credit: Kyle Terada-USA TODAY Sports

Sports fans are most likely to open their wallets and make an impulse purchase after their team wins a championship. As Instagram expands into e-commerce, it’s teaming up with the NBA and New Era to offer either Golden State Warriors or Toronto Raptors fans the opportunity to buy officially licensed championship gear as they’re popping champagne.

Here’s how the digital “tap to shop” promotion will work: The minute the buzzer sounds ending the 2019 NBA Finals, Instagram will instantly offer a $50 cap/t-shirt bundle for the winning team via New Era. The combo will be exclusively available on Instagram for 24 hours after the game’s conclusion. After that, the gear may go on sale at NewEraCap.com.

The 37.7 million followers of Instagram’s NBA account just have to tap on the post for details, then tap again to buy. Instead of being sent elsewhere they can handle the entire purchase within the app.

As the “authentic cap” of the NBA, New Era is currently selling Warriors/Raptors hats emblazoned with the gold “2019 NBA Finals” logo. The NBA, Instagram and Fanatics offered a similar “shoppable moment” after the Warriors won the Western Conference Finals.

“As the Authentic Cap of the NBA, we’re excited to honor the championship team with the official New Era Authentics: Championship Series Cap and Team Celebratory Tee Bundle exclusively available through the NBA’s Instagram,” says John Connors, New Era’s director of basketball. “This partnership gives us an opportunity to reach fans and provide them with product that helps them celebrate their team’s NBA championship.”

Paige Cohen, a spokeswoman for Instagram’s tech communications, notes fans “want to be part of” the winning team’s celebration. “They shop the gear, they get all decked out,” Cohen says. 

Cohen has a point, according to sports retail expert Mike May. Capitalizing on the thrill of victory can create a “financial windfall for those who have the right product at the right time.”

It can even inspire couch potatoes to put down the clicker and play the sport they’re watching on TV.

“When (fans) emotions are high there’s often a disconnect between common sense and spending — and spending just takes over,” says May, who consults for PHIT America. “It’s an interesting day and age that we live in. It gets faster. The immediacy of Instagram just adds to the festivities — and the spending.”

READ MORE: Canadian Craze Carrying NBA Finals Viewership

Instagram and New Era previously partnered with the NFL to offer a digital shopping experience during the 2019 Draft in Nashville.

The ceremonial act of young college football stars putting on the cap of their new NFL teams has become part of the NFL Draft day ritual. A photographer shot photos of the players in their New Era caps. The photos were shared to the NFL’s Instagram account, complete with shopping tags, driving fans to NFLShop.com. The caps sold for $30 to $38.

The NBA can tap into a huge pool of hoops fans on social media. The NBA’s Instagram account boasts the most followers of any pro league account. The account has drawn 11.8 billion views, and 1.3 billion engagements, this season alone. And Instagram’s new role as a digital mall keeps growing.

In March, the social media giant launched a “Checkout on Instagram” button that enables users to shop and buy products without leaving the app. Users enter their name, email, billing information and shipping address.

Over 1 billion people use Instagram every month, according to Hootsuite, with 500 million on the platform every day. Roughly 60% utilize Instagram to discover new products.

READ MORE: NBA and Twitter Team Up to Bring “Virtual Sports Bar” to Life

Sam Farber, the NBA’s vice president of digital media, said the Finals offer the league an opportunity to “test innovative initiatives” during its biggest event of the year.

With the Raptors leading the Warriors 3-2 in the NBA Finals, the series returns to Oakland for Game 6 Thursday night. If the Warriors survive, the Finals moves to Toronto for Game 7 Sunday night.

“We’re excited to partner with both Instagram and New Era to bring exclusive merchandise to fans in a new way.”

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Stanley Pup Correspondent Fetches New Fans for NBC Sports & NHL

According to NBC Sports, the Stanley Pup campaign has had more than 18 million impressions this postseason.

Ian Thomas

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Photo Credit: NHL

The multiple-month grueling road to the Stanley Cup Final annually catches the attention of the sports world. This year, one of the most dogged chroniclers of that journey has helped the league gain even more traction – Sunny, the Stanley Pup correspondent.

The idea for a Stanley Pup correspondent was the brainchild of Matt Ziance, manager of consumer engagement at NBC Sports. After seeing the way that Sunny, a labrador and guide dog in training, had captivated audiences as the official Today Show puppy, the idea of having a dog being a continued part of the network’s coverage of the NHL playoffs was spawned.

“Each year during the Stanley Cup Playoffs, we’re always searching for new, organic ways to stand out in our overall marketing messaging,” Ziance said. “While looking at successful campaigns across our properties, we saw a strong connection between our fan base and utilizing puppies in our campaigns.”

That led NBC Sports to incorporate the Stanley Pup across its broadcasts and social posts on a weekly basis. Across the playoffs, Sunny traveled more than 10,000 miles across the country while attending games in Boston, Denver, San Jose and St. Louis, as well as appearing at the network’s studios in Stamford, Connecticut – creating unique content while also finalizing his guide dog training by working in high-volume areas and new surroundings.

That content has been a boon for NBC Sports, the NHL and the reach of the Stanley Cup Playoffs. According to NBC Sports, the Stanley Pup campaign has had more than 18 million impressions this postseason across collaborations with The TODAY Show, the NHL, the We Rate Dogs Twitter account and the Guide Dog Foundation – an audience that includes many who are connecting to the Stanley Cup and the NHL in a new way.

Dan Palla, director of consumer engagement marketing at NBC Sports, said the network spends significant time in the build up to the launch of the playoffs each year thinking of “every single way we can make the Stanley Cup Playoffs bigger than it has been before.”

“The tagline we use is ‘there is nothing like playoff hockey’ – there is an inherent truth to that and every hockey fan knows that,” Palla said. “It’s also about growing the game and making the Stanley Cup Playoffs resonate off the ice, and thinking of new ways to draw people into the compelling games and the culture.”

Palla said when he first heard of the idea of bringing Sunny onto the hockey team, he said “it’s hard not to smile when you think of a Stanley Pup correspondent – we knew it was an opportunity to bring hockey to audiences in a different way that felt like a shot worth taking.”

The NBC Sports team worked with the Today Show staff to understand what worked well with Sunny in terms of content, as well as with the Guide Dog Foundation to ensure that the experience would also be beneficial to Sunny’s training.

READ MORE: Like Novak Djokovic’s Outfit? NBCUniversal Wants To Help You Buy It

The ability to capture hockey-related content with Sunny has allowed the two NBCUniversal programs to have cross-company promotion on-air as well as on social media, while also having hockey content reach new audiences. For example, the Stanley Pup correspondent was featured on the popular We Rate Dogs Twitter account, which has more than eight million followers. That also helped spark user-generated content coming from hockey fans and dog lovers alike on how their own ‘Stanley Pups’ were enjoying the playoffs.

Palla said NBC Sports has made it “mission critical” to help raise awareness of the sport and the NHL outside of the traditional ways of marketing hockey, something that he thinks has helped viewership. The NHL 2018-2019 regular season averaged 424,000 viewers across NBC Sports’ TV and digital platforms, up 2% from the previous year.

Both Palla and Ziance said the network has been thrilled with Sunny’s contribution to this year’s playoffs. While Sunny is now leaving the NBCUniversal family to become a full-time guide dog, Ziance said the idea of another future Stanley Pup Correspondent is something the network will consider not only for the 2020 playoffs, but potentially for the regular season as well.

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Twitter Doesn’t Want Sports Rights

Front Office Sports

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*This piece first appeared in the Front Office Sports Newsletter. Subscribe today and get the news before anyone else.

You can count out at least one social media company from the TV sports rights game. 

According to Max Mason of The Australian Financial Review, the company is not interested in battling for major sports rights, but wants to partner with rights holders, such as TV broadcasters, to extend their audiences and bring in more money.

Friend, not foe…

While Twitter does have deals to broadcast games on its platform with leagues like the WNBA, NWHL and more, the goal for the platform is not to be a linear TV broadcaster.

“The way that we’re approaching our business and our partnerships in the space is not to compete with rights holders. I don’t want to be a linear television broadcaster.” – Kay Madati, Twitter’s vice-president and global head of content partnerships

Bigger together…

Instead of competing with one another, Madati and Twitter want to serve as a way for traditional linear broadcasters to be able to amplify their content and drive new revenue.

“We’re here to make those events bigger by marrying the conversation that happens on our platform around those things. We’re here to actually come to them and say ‘we can make your event, your investment in this property that much bigger and that much better’.” – Kay Madati

More video is good for Twitter…

According to Mason, video has become the dominant source of revenue for Twitter, comprising 50% of money coming in.

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