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Athletes In Business

Jake Plummer Carries Quarterback Lessons into the Startup World

After years on the sidelines in retirement, the Pro Bowl quarterback has entered business world by co-founding ReadyList Sports.

Mike Piellucci

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Photo Courtesy: ReadyList Sports

Jake Plummer isn’t ashamed to admit it: The former Pro Bowl quarterback had no idea what he was getting into when he agreed to co-found a startup. He’s just glad his wife gave him a push.

He had been out of the NFL for nine years in 2015, and none of his post-retirement projects had stuck. None of them necessarily had to, either, with the windfall he accrued over 10 NFL seasons. He briefly took up coaching. He dabbled in real estate. He advocated for Charlotte’s Web CBD, a hemp oil. A stint on television with the Pac-12 proved to be short-lived. “That got old pretty quick,” he says.

But he had no clear direction until Chad Friehauf, a friend and former teammate on the Denver Broncos, showed him with a 300-slide PowerPoint presentation at a Boulder, Colorado, coffee shop. The subject was a business venture called ReadyList Sports, a product that digitizes football playbooks and makes them interactive. Plummer returned home and went about his week until his wife, Kollette, urged him to call follow up with Friehauf.

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“’Did you look into that? It looked like a pretty cool idea. If it was to work, it would be a pretty awesome deal,’” Plummer recalls Kollette telling him. “Some men are afraid to admit it, but I’m not: My wife is usually right.”

Plummer signed on, and the two former quarterbacks got to work. As CEO, Friehauf handles the technical aspects. Plummer’s strength, meanwhile, is thinking ahead, not only to where the company is going but who it can partner with to get there.

“He’s definitely a big door-opener for us, whether it’s teams, coaches, investors, front office people, just his network now that his teammates are coaching high school or his teammates have kids in youth sports,” Friehauf says. “He’s great at seeing the big picture of where we want to take this thing.”

For Plummer, that means as high as possible. The product is tailored for all levels of competition, and Friehauf says ReadyList has clients ranging from youth flag football to the collegiate level via the University of Louisville. But its crown jewel is a longstanding relationship with current New York Jets and former Miami Dolphins head coach Adam Gase, who used the system in Miami after Plummer originally approached him during Gase’s time as the Broncos’ offensive coordinator. The next step is to add more clients like him.

“The pro level is where we feel we can validate this,” Plummer says. “Once you can convince a couple of coaches who are influential – and not just influential by making people do stuff, but if they do something, everyone is like, ‘Oh, we better check this out’ – that’s what we’re pursuing.”

Plummer says he’s encountered his fair share of pain points in his first-ever business venture. Among them: business terminology, the ever-changing timetables and updates associated with ReadyList’s technology, and, of course, work-life balance.

“You learn through business and starting this up that the work’s really never done,” he says. “There’s always somebody I haven’t called or emailed or told about this, so it can be tiresome if you don’t say ‘Alright, it’s 5 o’clock, I’m done. I won’t make any more calls, won’t answer any more emails.'”

Perhaps the greatest challenge of all, however, lies in persuading the often-close-minded world of football to think differently. That was never a problem for Plummer, who famously left the NFL to pursue a career in handball. It can be another matter entirely for coaches who are sometimes used to teaching players in a certain way for decades.

“We’re hoping that this tool can convince coaches, ‘Hey, there’s a better way to teach and there’s a more efficient way to run practices and everything,’” he says. “Kind of streamline that so time can be spent strategizing how to beat an opponent, not just getting kids lined up right.”

But four years of startup life have taught Plummer something valuable. After years on the sidelines following his retirement, he now realizes was more ready to take on a large-scale venture than he ever knew.

READ MORE: Less is More: How Andrew Luck Handles Off-The-Field Partnerships

“Being a quarterback, I realize I was already so immersed in business, but I didn’t know it,” he says. “You’ve got to be able to really play a lot of different roles. So as the business side of things has come around, I’ve learned a lot about it. It’s really been an easier transition than I thought, just because, as a QB, you’ve got to know your personnel, right?

“You’ve got to know your guys, how they respond when you push them, how you respond when they’re praising them, and the same goes with business. You’ve got to know when to put the pedal to the metal and when to lay off a little bit.”

Plummer is well aware that the work is only beginning. ReadyList intends to launch a new high school-specific product within the month, while the football offseason represents a prime sales opportunity for teams eager to get their selections in this month’s NFL draft up to speed as soon as possible once they’re signed. It’s been more than two decades since Plummer was in that situation as a first-round pick out of Arizona State. He’s learning to reacclimate to the learning curve.

“As a businessman now, to correlate to playing ball, you have failures,” he says. “You lose games, but you’ve just got to back to the drawing board and figure out what you can do better next time.”

Athletes In Business

NFL Helps Former Players Succeed In New Business Ventures

For NFL players starting new careers after retirement, finding the right job is easier said than done. The league’s NFL Legends Community was built to help.

Craig Ellenport

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Photo Credit: Kirby Lee-USA TODAY Sports

For NFL players starting new careers after retirement, finding the right job is easier said than done. Some stayed involved in the game, but others seek new challenges. Either way, this process requires a new set of teammates.

For the past five years, the league’s NFL Legends Community has been providing that help. According to Tracy Perlman, NFL senior vice president, player marketing and communications, its mission is to connect, celebrate and engage the players.

“The biggest thing for us is building a community of care,” Perlman says, noting more than 3,000 players last year alone came back for an event with one of their former teams.

Along with connections with former teams, NFL Legends helps by offering information about players’ health and wellness, providing career counseling and seminars and giving access to financial grants and tuition assistance.

From a marketing side, the program can help retired players find the base to build a brand.

NFL Legends is working with NFL Films to create a highlight reels for those former players who make the request, at no cost to the subject.

“It doesn’t really matter how big or small you are, it’s really about your story,” Perlman says. “And we’ve really gotten everybody internally to buy into the fact that these guys busted their butts on the field, fought every day for their job, and they’re just as successful off the field. And we’ve been able to get everybody in to tell those stories.”

With approximately 9,000 former players registered in the NFL Legends Community, there are a lot of stories. Many players have built successful businesses that have nothing to do with their previous lives in the NFL. However, unlike playing in the NFL, where a player will easily get noticed for talent, some former pros need more help growing their business. The league is going so far as to create an NFL Legends Business Directory.

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“We’re going to get all of the players who own businesses into a resource guide that we can share with our partners and internally, so that we can start to give business to those companies,” Perlman says.

The NFL Legends Business Directory is expected to be available by the start of the 2019 season. To help get that done, NFL Legends is partnering with Carter Brothers, a management consulting firm founded by Pro Football Hall of Famer Cris Carter and his brother John.

“When we met with the NFL, we thought this would be a great fit for us to help them put everybody in a directory and push that out to the marketplace to help those ex-NFL Legends gain more visibility and, we believe more opportunity,” John, titled CEO and vice chairman of Carter Brothers, says.

The NFL will share the directory with all 32 teams. One former player who runs a window business is currently involved in construction of the Raiders’ new stadium in Las Vegas.

“I think the NFL has done a really good job of saying, ‘We want to help these guys after they’re done playing football,’” John Carter says. “And I think that is a value for all parties.”

Carter noted that 50% of the CEOs in corporate America played some kind of organized sport. Having worked with many former players, he knows the habits of highly successful athletes translate well into the business world.

“I think the marketplace will be highly surprised about the intelligence of current players and ex-NFL legends,” he says. “They bring a lot of creativity to the marketplace. Obviously, most of them have really good leadership skills, are able to build a good team around them. They have the financial wherewithal to invest in smart businesses. What we want to do is put all of that information in a depository, so when people want to see it or they’re looking for certain things in the marketplace, they can get to it quickly without any issues.”

READ MORE: Trio of NFL Players Work Together for A Dunkin’ Retirement

While members of the NFL Legends Community will benefit from added business they may receive, they will also gain more knowledge and experience from greater penetration into corporate America.

“Anything that we can do in assisting the NFL in doing that, that’s what we’re there for,” Carter says.

If all goes according to plan, many former NFL players will have less time to enjoy the upcoming season as they spend more time growing their business.

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Athletes In Business

Master & Dynamic Becomes Latest Equity Partnership for Kevin Durant

Audio company Master & Dynamic is the latest venture for Kevin Durant and his Thirty Five Ventures, a diverse business portfolio.

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Photo Credit: Troy Taormina-USA TODAY Sports

Kevin Durant continues to collect a diverse array of investments and equity partnerships, most recently in the audio world.

Durant’s Thirty Five Ventures recently announced it became an equity partner of Master & Dynamic, adding to a portfolio that includes Postmates, Acorns, Overtime, Coinbase  and the ESPN+ show “The Boardroom.”

Durant, along with business partner Rich Kleiman, became attracted to the brand due to its technology and luxury design.

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“Master & Dynamic has been elevating the audio game since they launched in 2014 and I felt that they were a company I had to get involved with,” Durant said in a release. “Music is such a huge part of my life that their products have become an important part of my day-to-day and I’m looking forward to some amazing collaboration between our teams.”

The relationship started as Kleiman’s family friend introduced Durant to the brand and Durant saw the potential in the products. The company could not yet afford Durant as a brand spokesperson, but Kleiman and Durant saw the fit with what they are building at Thirty Five Ventures.

“They were open to partnering on a major level, creatively and building the overall business,” Kleiman says. “It’s one of the key investments we’ve made that works across all verticals.

“It’s something Kevin himself is very gung-ho to move the needle on and something you’ll see more of, it’s not just checking the box on an investment list.”

A special edition of “Studio 35” colorway of the company’s MW65 Active Noise-Cancelling Wireless Over-Ear Headphones will be launched and Durant and Thirty Five Ventures will continue to have the ability to help influence the company as it builds into the intersection of sport and music.

“The more time I spent with Kevin and the Thirty Five Ventures team, the more I realized how Kevin’s deep love of music and technology and approach to his craft – basketball – mirrors that of Master & Dynamic: Concentration, focus, and a tireless and dynamic pursuit of mastery,” says Jonathan Levine, founder and CEO, Master & Dynamic. “And he does this based on his own internal drive rather than a need to impress the world.”

Thirty Five Ventures stemmed from Durant’s desire to be more than a basketball brand persona. The business was started in 2017 and ranges from content production to investment portfolio to the Kevin Durant Charity Foundation.

“We didn’t set out to build a media business, studio, investment portfolio, but we knew wanted to create an enterprise, be entrepreneurs and do something that was ours, a myriad of everything,” Kleiman said. “Kevin is truly the force behind the business we’re building, not the face.”

Durant is one of many athletes now venturing further into equity partnerships, which Kleiman says is a result of athletes realizing they should utilize their larger-than-life brands with authenticity and building something they’re connected with. This formula is priceless and not solely about the money.

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The strategy behind Thirty Five Ventures’ business development depends on the project. For investments, there is a small team, including Kleiman and Durant, who analyze deals to determine if it is a worthwhile venture. Some deals the duo acts as passive investors, while on others, they look to dive all the way in as partners, as is the case with Master & Dynamic.

“We’re investing in early stage companies for the most part,” Kleiman says. “Some companies, like Postmates, you see obvious synergies. Some are CEOs we connect with on an incredible level personally and believe in what they’re building.”

Whether it’s turning “The Boardroom” into the preeminent cultural sports business show or building brands Durant can be proud of, he’s working both on and off the court to cement his legacy. Master & Dynamic is the latest piece of the puzzle.

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Athletes In Business

Lagardere’s Rosenberg Brings Athlete’s Competitiveness to Charity Agency

From the tennis court to the agency world, Lagardere’s Carla Rosenberg has carved out a high-profile niche in the charity agency world.

Mike Piellucci

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Photo Courtesy: Carla Rosenberg

From the time when she was old enough to harbor professional goals, Lagardere’s Carla Rosenberg had a plan.

First, the lifelong tennis player and scholarship athlete at the University of Illinois would win Wimbledon. Then, after her playing days wound down, she would study medicine in the hopes of curing multiple sclerosis, the disease which her mother was diagnosed with in 1993 shortly after their family relocated from South Africa to suburban Dallas. Her career would take shape at the intersection of competition and compassion.

Wimbledon didn’t happen. Neither did med school. But she credits the ethos behind those goals as the driving force for her sports industry career as the founder of MatchPoint Agency, which works with athlete foundations and nonprofit organizations to both plan events and manage overall operations.

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“This is the way for me to stay involved in sports, and I love feeling good about giving back every event we do make an impact,” she says. “This is definitely an area that not only interests me but inspires me.”

Rosenberg cut her teeth on the team side, first for the Texas Rangers and later for the Dallas Stars. It was with the latter where she broke into community relations work by serving as the director for the Dallas Stars Foundation as well as a senior director for community marketing. She entered the agency world in 2010 and spent two years primarily focused on marketing and branding across stops at SCA Promotions and Zelo Public Relations.

But it wasn’t until August 2012 when her interests crystalized. She was happiest when she was working with charities, but she also the agency world. The solution, her family insisted, was to start her own shop. The first step was to come up with a name, so she headed to a place renowned for inspiration – Starbucks. Within five minutes, she came up with MatchPoint, a tie-in to her tennis career and, as she says, “the only point that matters.”

“Quickest decision I’ve ever had to make was the name,” she says with a laugh. “Everything else, not as easy and not as quick.”

Athletes’ philanthropic work can be as diverse as the players themselves, both in structure as well as cause. Some simply want to plan a single event. Others want a full-on foundation. Some have a passion project. Others prefer broad-based work. And all of them have a different way of handling it.

Fundamentally, Rosenberg’s job boils down to two components: Plan successful charity events and help foundations realize a profit. But no two clients have the same road map for getting there, which forces her to wear a wide variety of hats. She must be adept at speaking legalese with attorneys to form the foundation; understand the athlete’s brand well enough to handle the foundation’s marketing and public relations; network to raise funds; keep a trained eye on website design; and be meticulous enough to organize seven-figure events. She’s blended them all well enough to count the likes of former NBA MVP Dirk Nowitzki, women’s basketball legend Nancy Lieberman and all-time Dallas Stars win leader Marty Turco as clients.

“It’s not like we’re doing rocket science, but everything we do here is strategic and everything is custom,” she says. “There is no cookie cutter. Everyone is at a different stage in their career. Every charity at a different stage of their formation.”

It’s a diffuse, complex skill set, which helps explain why charity agencies remain a relatively small niche. Yet Kern Egan, President, Americas at Lagardere Plus, believes it’s the sort of sphere that more athletes will begin to gravitate toward at a time when hands-on brand management is becoming more ubiquitous.

“When you’re going to raise your game in that space like you might do on the field or on the court, I think the days of it being your sibling or your spouse or an uncle managing that for you starts to become not as practical as somebody more professional in that space,” Egan says. “As athletes want to give back more, as they want to formalize that part of their brand more, they want more sophistication in and around how that’s managed.

“And there are very few people like Carla that can do that.”

Egan would know. He first befriended Rosenberg through Dallas Influencers in Sports and Entertainment, a professional networking group in Dallas, and wound up leasing her office space in Lagardere’s Uptown Dallas building. It afforded him an up-close view of her work. He ultimately was so impressed that he orchestrated a deal for Lagardere to acquire MatchPoint outright in 2018.

“You’ve got people that understand the nonprofit space. Then you have people that understand the events space. But to be at that intersection… is really special,” he says.

Turco, who now serves as the President of the Dallas Stars foundation, agrees. After years of working with Rosenberg as both a current and former player, he compares her breadth of high-level talents to those of a five-tool player in baseball.

“[As athletes], we think about our own reputation,” he says. “You attach Carla Rosenberg to yours, and it only enhances it.”

Now, with a year under her belt at Lagardere, Rosenberg has a fresh set of goals. Lagardere’s client roster opened up doors to a new list of clients to help and events to plan. But on a macro level, she’s channeling her old competitiveness from the tennis court into setting a new standard within her field.

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“I’ll put it out there: The ultimate goal is to take this group and really make our thumbprint and that we become like kind of the benchmark for other agencies in this field,” she says. “Like IMG, Wasserman, CAA, Octagon – I hope we can make a big enough impact that everyone’s looking at it like, ‘We want to do what they’re doing,’ or ‘We want to have the group they’ve having.’ I hope we can become that.”

At least one person is convinced she’s already there. Now that he’s on the charity side himself, Marty Turco can’t foresee any of Rosenberg’s competitors rallying past her.

“Anybody who wants to accomplish what she has, I wish them all the luck in the world,” he says.

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