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6 Sports Business Books That Should Be on Your Holiday Wish List

Having trouble with your holiday wish list? Be sure to ask for these highly recommended sports business books that will surely help your career.

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The holidays are upon us once again. While we may have grown out of writing letters to Santa Claus, plenty of us still keep track of the things we want to give or get on our Amazon Wish List or something similar. To quote the late, great Nelson Mandela, “If you make one gift this year, make it the gift of knowledge.”

The SportsBiz Book Exchange is a project headed up by Mark Hodgkin of NeuLion College in which sports industry professionals can share their favorite reads with one another. The exchange includes folks from every stage of their careers from interns to CEOs, all learning from each other as well as the material.

A few of their most active members offered recommendations for your must-read list this holiday season.

Year of Yes” by Shonda Rhimes

Rhimes, a very successful television producer, has a lot going on. But in this book, she details how being open to new experiences and new challenges helped push her to the next level both as a person and as a professional.

“I’ve been on a kick to read more books written by women, and after checking out the reviews, I quickly ordered this one. This book was absolutely incredible and I recommend it to everyone I know who enjoys a good read. Like me, Shonda is an introvert; she works hard and spends whatever free time she has at home with her family.

“However, she challenged herself to a yearlong journey of saying ‘yes’ to everything, whether it be media requests, speaking engagements, family time, etc. The book is her story of that year and what she learned about herself. Easily one of my all-time favorites!”

– Katie Gwinn Hewitt, associate director of external communications and PR at the University of Michigan

Brands Win Championships” and “Athletes Are Brands Too” by Jeremy Darlow

A veteran of the brand-building world, Darlow wrote two books that are essential for every marketing student. In “Brands,” Darlow details the key elements of building brands that top-level athletes want to play for. In “Athletes,” he focuses more on how to create a personal brand for individual athletes, or anyone else.

“I really enjoyed Jeremy Darlow’s ‘Athletes Are Brands Too,’ his follow-up to ‘Brands Win Championships.’ ‘Athletes Are Brands Too’ focuses on how building a brand can lead to success off the field during and after an athletic career is over. The book serves as a blueprint on how to capitalize on opportunities that will reach far beyond sports. Even if you are not an athlete, the book highlights how to build a personal brand through strategic marketing. Both ‘Brands Win Championships’ and ‘Athletes Are Brands Too’ should be on your holiday wish list if you are in the sports industry.”

Joe Centeno, art director at Team Infographics

Shoe Dog” by Phil Knight

Ever been curious about how Nike grew from a prototype shoe in the 1960s to a multi-billion dollar company today? In “Shoe Dog,” Knight goes over that process extensively, as well as the experiences that helped shape him into the kind of businessman that he is today.

“It’s a fascinating read for sports junkies and entrepreneurs. Nike is about as transformative a company as there’s ever been in sports business, and though I wish this would have a sequel on the later years, it’s fascinating to see where the company started.”

– Mark Hodgkin, director of product innovation at Neulion College

Creativity, Inc.: Overcoming the Unseen Forces That Stand in the Way of True Inspiration” by Ed Catmull

This book contains lessons on leadership and overcoming creative obstacles that came from the inception and rise of Pixar Animation Studios. Catmull’s stories are helpful in not only showing new ways to find way good ideas, but in how to make good ideas become great ideas.

“What I found most appealing in ‘Creativity, Inc.’ was learning about creating a culture of creativity and originality, being comfortable with breaking the norm. I was so refreshed by the self-awareness, humility, and sense of whimsy that was woven throughout Catmull’s messages. And what I love about the #SBBX, in general, is that Mark Hodgkin has paired me with such great reads that I may not have picked up otherwise, while also fostering an environment of stronger relationships with others in the sports industry.”

– Katie Cavender, strategic communications and digital/social media at the College Football Playoff

What Made Maddy Run” by Kate Fagan

An essential quality of anyone who works with young athletes is empathy. The story detailed in this book is evidence of what high school and college athletes deal with in terms of pressure and, hopefully, can lead to fewer outcomes like this in the future.

“Fagan does an excellent job telling the story of Maddy Holleran, a Penn track student who committed suicide because of the pressure she put on herself and unrealistic expectations she set for herself. Maddy’s story is more common than people realize, and anyone who works in college athletics or interacts with student-athletes should read this book.”

– Hannah Bradley, media relations for the Southern Conference

For more great reads that can help you take the next step in your professional development, consider joining the SportsBiz Book Exchange. They do new exchanges every couple of months. To get updates on new exchanges, follow the #SBBX hashtag on Twitter.

Joe is currently a freelance marketing professional, writer, and podcaster. His work can also be found on the SB Nation network. Joe earned his bachelor's degree in communications from the University of Louisville in 2014 and a master's degree in sport administration from Seattle University in 2017. He can be reached via email at joe@frntofficesport.com.

Professional Development

Fuel Academy Propels Fans and Staff At Michigan International Speedway

In the past, MIS brought on seasonal staff to help its ticket sales and customer service efforts. However, this year it formalized that program and structured training, branding it Fuel Academy.

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MIS Fuel Academy
Photo Credit: Mike DiNovo-USA TODAY Sports

Breaking into the sports industry can be a daunting career path, so Michigan International Speedway has launched a training program that not only helps young professionals, but aims to improve the track’s customer service as well.

In the past, MIS brought on seasonal staff to help its ticket sales and customer service efforts. However, this year it formalized that program and structured training, branding it Fuel Academy – an effort MIS President Rick Brenner says aims to help both the employee and the organization.

“For the past few years, we’ve worked to create and implement outbound sales to provide customers with better service, and allow folks to talk to people here at the track,” Brenner said. “Now, we want to frame it up, give it its own face and brand — the goal is to create an opportunity for young people to come in and grow and sell tickets.”

READ MORE: A Look at the New Foundation of Richmond Raceway’s Ticket Sales

Brenner said the development of the Fuel Academy was a group effort internally at MIS, especially spurred by the hiring of Ryan Shelton and Michael Neis. They helped put together a “guide book” for success and lead the Fuel Academy class through role-playing conversations and product knowledge before letting them loose in sales efforts.

Shelton, the vice president of business operations, joined MIS earlier this year following six years with the Salem Red Sox, including three seasons as the team’s president and general manager. Neis joined the team as director of ticket sales and service following six years with the Oakland Athletics, most recently as director of membership and premium services.

“A lot of young professionals, college students, are looking for their first opportunities to get into the sports business,” Brenner said. “This is an opportunity for them to learn from some of the very best and development skill sets and provide them with a road map to top-notch service.”

Brenner said the goal for Fuel Academy is to prepare students to sell better during their time at MIS but also setting them up for greater success in their careers – even if that’s not with the organization.

From the outside Fuel Academy may look similar to any other inside sales program, Shelton said, but it is based on what he’s learned on throughout his career and adapted and evolved with the times. The first week is largely spent with leadership discussing the organization’s “why,” he said, and the new staff also spends the week going through role play situations and product knowledge so they’re fully comfortable by the time they jump on the phones.

Through the rest of the 24-week program, there are weekly individual meetings to look at their greatest victory and figure out if it’s repeatable and to set goals and to fix hitches throughout their sales process, whether the issue is getting appointments or closing sales.

“We don’t want to have them feeling lost or a manager feeling frustrating and bottling things up,” Shelton said. “A lot of it is helping them understand we control our destiny. We really want them to understand it controllable and developing relationships with clients and engaging them to lead them to return at a higher rate.”

Like MIS, more organizations are looking toward a more personalized approach to building young professionals’ careers, ranging from sales specific programs in colleges to sales leadership programs within pro sports organizations, like the Atlanta Hawks.

“Selfishly, we could probably hold on to them longer, but we don’t look at people as a number, we look at them as people and do whatever we can do to help them get to whatever they want to do at the next level,” Myers Dean, Hawks manager of new memberships said. “We don’t want to hold them back. Now we have so many, they call us when they need account executive, and most of the time we can send them a few right away.”

Shelton said through running programs similar to Fuel Academy throughout his career, he’s seen approximately 75% stay in the sports business, many advancing to leadership positions. He’s now the only remaining professional in sports from his 14-person inside sales class.

The past weekend was one of the biggest days of the year for MIS, with the FireKeepers Casino 400. Brenner said it was a crucial weekend to have these young professionals better prepared and on the ground telling the story of MIS’ fan-centric endeavors, as well as selling renewal plans for next year. Now they’ll prepare for the next major race in August.

Having more highly-trained salespeople will also be a boon for the track, which added several new fan-friendly initiatives this year such as an air-conditioned hospitality area and free pit passes for children under 12. Tickets are also now priced dynamically based on demand, Brenner said, to help make them more affordable. The 1,400-acre site also features free concerts and other entertainment options beyond just racing.

READ MORE: How NASCAR Stays Up to Speed in the Ever-Changing Digital Space

“We’ve added a slew of entertainment options and focused on our fan experience and want to show them we value their time with how we’re treating them,” Brenner said. “We’re really looking at the total experienced building out a package around the races.”

Brenner said he hopes the introduction of the more-structured Fuel Academy will not only help “fuel our crowd,” but also the young professional he hopes it attracts.

“Hopefully we look down the road 10 years and we’ve got a whole bunch of alumni that are either here or excelling and moving on to organizations across sports,” Brenner said. “We want to embrace the fact that folks are interested in sports and that it’s a great path to start a career and develop knowledge that will be useful in any sport or facility.”

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Professional Development

Inside The Huddle: Group Expectations with Michael Taylor

After ten years on the business side of pro basketball, Michael Taylor has learned how valuable persistence and personal branding are in ticket sales.

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In the buildup to Front Office Sports’ Ticketing Huddle at the Oakland-Alameda County Coliseum on May 10, we’re introducing you to the huddle leaders who will be lending their expertise to the conversation.

Today, meet Michael Taylor: Director of Team Marketing & Business Operations at the National Basketball Association (NBA). Taylor will be one of the leaders of the huddle “Squad Goals: The Evolution of Group Expectations.”

Taylor played basketball at West Virginia State University, where he graduated in 2004 with a degree in business administration and management. After playing basketball in Europe for a few years, pursuing a career on the business side of basketball simply made sense. It’s also proved to be a natural fit. For example, during his time in Detroit with Palace Sports and Entertainment, the group sales department jumped from 29th in revenue leaguewide to fifth in just over three years.

READ MORE: Inside The Huddle: Premium Sales with Naimah German

Now, with over a decade in the NBA, Taylor takes great pride in the people he has been able to develop.

“I look at some of the people that I’ve been able to work with and have hired and are thriving in the industry and moving on to different leadership positions, and that is probably the thing I’m most proud of,” he says. “The people and the development pieces are where I like to focus my time.”

The biggest mistake that Taylor sees young reps making in their early years is not having a short memory.

“In this business you have to be able to take the bad days…the days where you make a hundred calls and 50 people hang up on you and you leave 50 voicemails and no one returns,” he says. “You have to be able to maintain the same enthusiasm, the same confidence on that next call. And then, on the flip side, you have a day where maybe you made that big sale. Do you then slack off? Do you get complacent? Do you not focus on your fundamentals anymore because you’re starting to see some success? Don’t focus on what happened yesterday, whether it was good or bad, but approach each day as a chance to be great.”

READ MORE: Inside The Huddle: Group Expectations With Josh Feinberg

Taylor’s other piece of advice to young professionals just beginning their career in ticket sales is to constantly be maintaining their reputation online and in real life.

“It’s never too early to think of yourself as a brand,” he say. “The things that you do now, you’re building your reputation before you even realize it. The sports world is small. When you think about applying for internships or applying for jobs, your reputation is what speaks before you even get into the room. Everything that they do either adds to their brand, or it takes away from it.”

Meet Michael and hear more of his thoughts on the current ticketing space at the Front Office Sports Ticketing Huddle at the Oakland-Alameda County Coliseum in Oakland, CA on May 10. For tickets and additional info, click here.

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Professional Development

Inside The Huddle: Premium Sales with Naimah German

German will lend her expertise on premium sales at the Front Office Sports Ticketing Huddle at the Oakland Coliseum on May 10.

Front Office Sports

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In the buildup to Front Office Sports’ Ticketing Huddle at the Oakland-Alameda County Coliseum on May 10, we’re introducing you to the huddle leaders who will be lending their expertise to the conversation.

Today, meet Naimah German: Premium Sales Consultant with Legends at the Las Vegas Stadium (the future home of the Raiders). German will be one of the leaders of the huddle “The Experience Economy: Navigating Shifting Premium Sales Demands.”

READ MORE: Inside The Huddle: Group Expectations With Josh Feinberg

German made the move to Nevada in January of 2018 ahead of the Raiders moving to and playing their first season in Las Vegas in 2020. In the months since, German and the rest of the organization have had their hands full in the best possible way.

“It has been a whirlwind to have that many people on the waitlist,” she says, “but we were all committed from the very beginning, and we are making adjustments as we go along. So it’s been a lot of learning as we go through that process of checks and balances and communicating with one another.”

Prior to arriving in Las Vegas, German graduated from the University of South Carolina in 2007 and worked in insurance and advertising sales for a number of years before completing her master’s degree through Northeastern University in 2014. German’s breakthrough, and what she describes as one of her proudest professional accomplishments, came in 2015 when she landed a Membership Development Associate role with the Miami Dolphins.

“That was the most rigorous process to get a job that I’ve ever been through,” German says, reflecting on the experience. “I did two separate phone interviews and then I had to fly myself out to Miami. But I knew that if I went down there, I was going to come back with the job. They had a hundred of us participate in a sales combine, and we competed for a job over the course of that whole weekend. They accepted nine people into that inside sales class and I was one of the nine.”

German then joined the Legends crew in 2016 as a Premium Sales Consultant with the Atlanta Falcons, where she stayed for about a year and a half before moving on to her current role in Las Vegas. With her experience on the premium side, German has learned that the ability to build strong relationships with clients go a long way.

“Ask questions and you will be able to build a relationship with someone and know why they want what they want,” she says. “Everyone wants the top-notch experience, so being able to identify potential problems early in the process is going to help alleviate any potential frustration.”

In her experience, German notices that many young sports professionals can define themselves by their work. While careers are important, she urges everyone to maintain a balance. 

READ MORE: Inside The Huddle: Selling A New Team With Ted Glick

“Don’t let the job take over your identity,” she says. “Sometimes people forget who they are with all their motivations and ambitions and what they want to do. Knowing you are more than what you do is a much healthier attitude to have in this business.”

Throughout her career, German has not lost sight of how sports can be a force for good. This is the primary reason she wanted to pursue a career in the industry, and why she continues down this path today.

“Sports is something that brings people together,” she says. “I always come back to that. When you’re at a game, we’re all one. We’re united.”

Meet Naimah and hear more of your thoughts on the current ticketing space at the Front Office Sports Ticketing Huddle at the Oakland-Alameda County Coliseum in Oakland, CA on May 10. For tickets and additional info, click here.

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